apolla: (Default)
So, I saw The Dark Knight this afternoon. It was very hot and I figured a cinema might be the best place for air con.

apolla: (Default)
So, I saw The Dark Knight this afternoon. It was very hot and I figured a cinema might be the best place for air con.

Charlton Heston

Sunday, 6 April 2008 19:21
apolla: (Default)
I have certain things I do when entertainment stars I like pass on to the great Grauman's in the Sky.

First, I hear it's happened. This recently happened by glancing through an office window in the City as I walked past and saw the tickertape thing at the bottom of the screen. It was Richard Widmark, who I knew and respected but had no particular affection for. My heart stopped for a nanosecond though, as I thought how terrible it would be to learn of someone I really loved dying in that manner. Just a glance at a TV in an office reception as you walk past... I can't think of many worse ways to learn of something like that, actually.

I once found out via text message. A friend, [personal profile] emony actually, texted me with the words: "Are you OK?" to which I replied "What?" or something because I had no idea what she meant. She replied "Never mind" because she didn't want me to worry about whatever it was... but it got me thinking and I nipped quickly onto the news while I was at work. There it was: Ronnie Barker dead. That was OK. I could deal. Actually, I pretended I hadn't seen it until I saw the late edition newspapers. When I got home I put on my Porridge DVDs and laughed hard.

It's funny how people react when people die. Even when they're unconnected to the deceased, their attitude changes to some degree. It becomes socially unacceptable to say a bad word about them, unless they were a particularly despicable brand of humanity.

Well, Charlton Heston is dead. I can't sit here and lie: I didn't like the guy. I generally don't give his movies room amongst my collection. There are two exceptions: 55 Days at Peking and Earthquake, and those also star Ava Gardner so are here on special dispensation. I've never seen all of 55 Days at Peking.

Now, what was I saying? Yes, I didn't like Charlton Heston. You may tell me about his civil rights campaigning, which was admirable and conducted even before it became the fashionable thing to do... but I find it hard to accept from someone who was such an ardent fan of guns: the 'out of my cold dead hands!" thing occasionally rattles nastily around my head.

It would be silly for me to say that I didn't like a movie star because of some of his private opinions. Hypocritical too - any Errol Flynn fan, after all, should think twice before condemning anyone for most anything. No, my dislike of Charlton Heston isn't about his political ideologies - it seems to me in some respects he cared mostly about personal freedom, which I'm a big fan of too. That his idea of political freedom seemed to me to be about letting everyone have whatever weaponry they wanted is not really here or there.

No, my reasons for disliking Chuck are really easy and simple: I just didn't like him. I've never particularly rated his abilities as an actor, just as I never rated Laurence Olivier. Perhaps it's that he was in films I never really cared for - the likes of Soylent Green or Planet of the Apes. It's not about his personality or opinions at all, it's that I just didn't like the movies. They weren't my cup of tea. I'm currently trying to watch 55 Days at Peking on VHS (remember those, anyone?) and I can't say I'm overawed by it. Even Earthquake is some way down my list of favourite disaster movies, below The Towering Inferno, Airport, The Cassandra Crossing and The Poseidon Adventure. In fact, if you include Titanic movies as part of the genre, I'd say certainly my beloved A Night To Remember and even Titanic rate higher.

Hell, by virtue of including Olivia De Havilland, Airport '77 rates higher too. Once I watch On The Beach all the way through (on my fourth attempt) it'll rate higher too.

I'm some way into 55 Days at this point, and I am bored. Miss Gardner is beautiful and sparkling, and that's all I can say about it so far. And now it's 8pm and I'll flick it off to watch a repeat of Top Gear.

Now, at this point there are some people who'd say "Oh, if you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all." But I don't want to let it pass unnoticed. He was a movie star, and deserves a comment even if nobody but the writer reads it. I didn't like him, and his movies hardly touch my life. Except that without them, Hollywood would be a different place.

We can all quote bits from his films - parting the red sea, SOYLENT GREEN IS PEOPLE! and all that damn-dirty-ape-omg-that's-the-statue-of-liberty stuff.

The thing for me is this: it marks the further passing into the foreign land of history of the world I have loved. This is a man who starred opposite Ava Gardner as her romantic lead. He was a contemporary of some of the world's favourite actors, even if you discount him as one yourself. With his death, that world gets further away.

I find it so hard to believe that people born during the age of Silent Movies are now either very old or dead, because to me, that isn't very long ago.

It's a selfish thought, but Charlton Heston dying for me points to more people dying, ones I really did love - Olivia De Havilland. Paul Newman. PETER O'TOOLE. Even say, Elizabeth Taylor.

One day, not very long from now, there won't be any of them left, and all we'll have to show for it are Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise. Which is OK, but it's not the Hollywood I absolutely love. All the Rat Pack are gone, did you know that? Joey Bishop died in October and the world hardly noticed.

My world is passing away from me, and one day it will be absolutely gone. I, presumably, will still be here.

So, Charlton Heston is dead. I'm sorry for his family. I hope his Alzheimer's was not unbearable because there's not a person on the planet who deserves such a fate. I can't lie though, I didn't like the guy and that was the case last week as it was today. Hope the Grauman's in the Sky gives him a good welcome.

Charlton Heston

Sunday, 6 April 2008 19:21
apolla: (Default)
I have certain things I do when entertainment stars I like pass on to the great Grauman's in the Sky.

First, I hear it's happened. This recently happened by glancing through an office window in the City as I walked past and saw the tickertape thing at the bottom of the screen. It was Richard Widmark, who I knew and respected but had no particular affection for. My heart stopped for a nanosecond though, as I thought how terrible it would be to learn of someone I really loved dying in that manner. Just a glance at a TV in an office reception as you walk past... I can't think of many worse ways to learn of something like that, actually.

I once found out via text message. A friend, [personal profile] emony actually, texted me with the words: "Are you OK?" to which I replied "What?" or something because I had no idea what she meant. She replied "Never mind" because she didn't want me to worry about whatever it was... but it got me thinking and I nipped quickly onto the news while I was at work. There it was: Ronnie Barker dead. That was OK. I could deal. Actually, I pretended I hadn't seen it until I saw the late edition newspapers. When I got home I put on my Porridge DVDs and laughed hard.

It's funny how people react when people die. Even when they're unconnected to the deceased, their attitude changes to some degree. It becomes socially unacceptable to say a bad word about them, unless they were a particularly despicable brand of humanity.

Well, Charlton Heston is dead. I can't sit here and lie: I didn't like the guy. I generally don't give his movies room amongst my collection. There are two exceptions: 55 Days at Peking and Earthquake, and those also star Ava Gardner so are here on special dispensation. I've never seen all of 55 Days at Peking.

Now, what was I saying? Yes, I didn't like Charlton Heston. You may tell me about his civil rights campaigning, which was admirable and conducted even before it became the fashionable thing to do... but I find it hard to accept from someone who was such an ardent fan of guns: the 'out of my cold dead hands!" thing occasionally rattles nastily around my head.

It would be silly for me to say that I didn't like a movie star because of some of his private opinions. Hypocritical too - any Errol Flynn fan, after all, should think twice before condemning anyone for most anything. No, my dislike of Charlton Heston isn't about his political ideologies - it seems to me in some respects he cared mostly about personal freedom, which I'm a big fan of too. That his idea of political freedom seemed to me to be about letting everyone have whatever weaponry they wanted is not really here or there.

No, my reasons for disliking Chuck are really easy and simple: I just didn't like him. I've never particularly rated his abilities as an actor, just as I never rated Laurence Olivier. Perhaps it's that he was in films I never really cared for - the likes of Soylent Green or Planet of the Apes. It's not about his personality or opinions at all, it's that I just didn't like the movies. They weren't my cup of tea. I'm currently trying to watch 55 Days at Peking on VHS (remember those, anyone?) and I can't say I'm overawed by it. Even Earthquake is some way down my list of favourite disaster movies, below The Towering Inferno, Airport, The Cassandra Crossing and The Poseidon Adventure. In fact, if you include Titanic movies as part of the genre, I'd say certainly my beloved A Night To Remember and even Titanic rate higher.

Hell, by virtue of including Olivia De Havilland, Airport '77 rates higher too. Once I watch On The Beach all the way through (on my fourth attempt) it'll rate higher too.

I'm some way into 55 Days at this point, and I am bored. Miss Gardner is beautiful and sparkling, and that's all I can say about it so far. And now it's 8pm and I'll flick it off to watch a repeat of Top Gear.

Now, at this point there are some people who'd say "Oh, if you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all." But I don't want to let it pass unnoticed. He was a movie star, and deserves a comment even if nobody but the writer reads it. I didn't like him, and his movies hardly touch my life. Except that without them, Hollywood would be a different place.

We can all quote bits from his films - parting the red sea, SOYLENT GREEN IS PEOPLE! and all that damn-dirty-ape-omg-that's-the-statue-of-liberty stuff.

The thing for me is this: it marks the further passing into the foreign land of history of the world I have loved. This is a man who starred opposite Ava Gardner as her romantic lead. He was a contemporary of some of the world's favourite actors, even if you discount him as one yourself. With his death, that world gets further away.

I find it so hard to believe that people born during the age of Silent Movies are now either very old or dead, because to me, that isn't very long ago.

It's a selfish thought, but Charlton Heston dying for me points to more people dying, ones I really did love - Olivia De Havilland. Paul Newman. PETER O'TOOLE. Even say, Elizabeth Taylor.

One day, not very long from now, there won't be any of them left, and all we'll have to show for it are Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise. Which is OK, but it's not the Hollywood I absolutely love. All the Rat Pack are gone, did you know that? Joey Bishop died in October and the world hardly noticed.

My world is passing away from me, and one day it will be absolutely gone. I, presumably, will still be here.

So, Charlton Heston is dead. I'm sorry for his family. I hope his Alzheimer's was not unbearable because there's not a person on the planet who deserves such a fate. I can't lie though, I didn't like the guy and that was the case last week as it was today. Hope the Grauman's in the Sky gives him a good welcome.

SNERK

Wednesday, 16 November 2005 21:14
apolla: (Queen Maeve)

I just clicked a link on my People.com daily email...

And promptly forgot cos I looked up to the TV to see James Purefoy totally fucking naked courtesy of Rome. Did not see such things this weekend. There are worse people to see naked, but I think I could've lived without it. Gratuitous, Auntie Beeb, very gratuitous.

Anyway, not entirely unrelated, this People thing. 2005's Sexiest Men Alive, which by the name alone cuts out most of the people I could give a rat's arse about... so I'm flicking through it. Matthew McConaughey, snore. Patrick Dempsey, blah. Viggo Mortensen, again. Vince Vaughn, from a certain angle on a cloudy day, I suppose. Terrence Howard, don't know the dude. Nick Lachey, wtf.  Heath Ledger, understandable. Daniel Dae Kim, well I haven't seen Lost so I don't know. Keith Urban, who the fuck? but looks like one of Busted. Ian McShane, wha.... Ian McShane? Ian Leatherface McShane? IAN LOVEJOY MCSHANE? Seriously America, what are you thinking? Do you need to be told about the early 90s horror that was Lovejoy? A shitey Sunday night extravaganza of antique dealing and gently-gently detectiveness and the HORROR, the UNBRIDLED HORROR of the blazer-jeans combination. The CURLY FUCKING MULLET.

Please people, and indeed People, do not let this pass. I'm not ageist, I'm anti-fuckwit. He's a cool enough guy, but one of the sexiest alive this year? No, no, no.

SNERK

Wednesday, 16 November 2005 21:14
apolla: (Queen Maeve)

I just clicked a link on my People.com daily email...

And promptly forgot cos I looked up to the TV to see James Purefoy totally fucking naked courtesy of Rome. Did not see such things this weekend. There are worse people to see naked, but I think I could've lived without it. Gratuitous, Auntie Beeb, very gratuitous.

Anyway, not entirely unrelated, this People thing. 2005's Sexiest Men Alive, which by the name alone cuts out most of the people I could give a rat's arse about... so I'm flicking through it. Matthew McConaughey, snore. Patrick Dempsey, blah. Viggo Mortensen, again. Vince Vaughn, from a certain angle on a cloudy day, I suppose. Terrence Howard, don't know the dude. Nick Lachey, wtf.  Heath Ledger, understandable. Daniel Dae Kim, well I haven't seen Lost so I don't know. Keith Urban, who the fuck? but looks like one of Busted. Ian McShane, wha.... Ian McShane? Ian Leatherface McShane? IAN LOVEJOY MCSHANE? Seriously America, what are you thinking? Do you need to be told about the early 90s horror that was Lovejoy? A shitey Sunday night extravaganza of antique dealing and gently-gently detectiveness and the HORROR, the UNBRIDLED HORROR of the blazer-jeans combination. The CURLY FUCKING MULLET.

Please people, and indeed People, do not let this pass. I'm not ageist, I'm anti-fuckwit. He's a cool enough guy, but one of the sexiest alive this year? No, no, no.

Growl.

Wednesday, 16 November 2005 01:15
apolla: (Fleen)

My plane back from Rome Ciampino was an hour late and for no particularly good reason. When it finally got us back to Stansted, they made us all get off the plane at the front, presumably so they didn't have to pay for two lots of stairs. The plane got in at eleven pm and we finallymade it to our car an hour later. This is not a big airport, man. Grr.

Then I get home,  tired and dischuffed, to discover that Mark Lamarr has quit Never Mind The Buzzcocks except not really and he'll be back in 2007 (if it hasn't all gone arse over head without him) and joy of joys: Jason Donovan Set To Play Errol Flynn.

If I were not so very tired, if my head had not been aching almost constantly since at least Saturday afternoon, I would give you some indication of how totally fucking stupid this would be. Bitterly, bitterly ironic from my point of view, but totally stupid. Jason Donovan as The World's Most Beautiful Man? Jason Donovan as The World's Most Charming Man? Jason Donovan as The Greatest Swashbuckler To Ever Sail The Studio Seas? I think not. If I were not so tired, I would say more, but I am that tired and all I can say is this: PLEASE GOD NO!

Also: Best Thing Ever: walking towards St Peter's seeing a nun walking down the street side by side with someone wearing a Kurt Cobain t-shirt. Genius. Had I known about this Jason Donovan thing, I might have spent a great deal of time in the basilica praying to the Lord God Almighty for some seriously divine intervention.

Growl.

Wednesday, 16 November 2005 01:15
apolla: (Fleen)

My plane back from Rome Ciampino was an hour late and for no particularly good reason. When it finally got us back to Stansted, they made us all get off the plane at the front, presumably so they didn't have to pay for two lots of stairs. The plane got in at eleven pm and we finallymade it to our car an hour later. This is not a big airport, man. Grr.

Then I get home,  tired and dischuffed, to discover that Mark Lamarr has quit Never Mind The Buzzcocks except not really and he'll be back in 2007 (if it hasn't all gone arse over head without him) and joy of joys: Jason Donovan Set To Play Errol Flynn.

If I were not so very tired, if my head had not been aching almost constantly since at least Saturday afternoon, I would give you some indication of how totally fucking stupid this would be. Bitterly, bitterly ironic from my point of view, but totally stupid. Jason Donovan as The World's Most Beautiful Man? Jason Donovan as The World's Most Charming Man? Jason Donovan as The Greatest Swashbuckler To Ever Sail The Studio Seas? I think not. If I were not so tired, I would say more, but I am that tired and all I can say is this: PLEASE GOD NO!

Also: Best Thing Ever: walking towards St Peter's seeing a nun walking down the street side by side with someone wearing a Kurt Cobain t-shirt. Genius. Had I known about this Jason Donovan thing, I might have spent a great deal of time in the basilica praying to the Lord God Almighty for some seriously divine intervention.

Episode Three

Saturday, 5 November 2005 16:51
apolla: (Phantom)

I've finally bothered to watch Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sniff, or whatever it's called.

Last fifteen minutes were pretty marvellous. Sadly, the two hours preceeding were filled with idiot dialogue, so much CGI that it was hard to focus and enough wooden acting to replant the Amazon rainforest.

I know that my hatred of George Lucas is well-known, so I won't bore you with that. I will tell you this: I would really love to love Star Wars. I think it's a great idea and although I disliked Episode II, I at least came away understanding a bit better about Vader in the OT. I just didn't realise that the petulant teenager thing would run over into the third installment too. I would love to love Star Wars, but it's not going to happen because these just aren't very good films. The original ones suffer only from the genuinely shite and primitive technology used (although that never really stood in Harryhausen's way...) but the recent lot are just... naff. It's like they creak under the weight of what they precede, and so perhaps that's why only the last fifteen minutes of III really stood out for me. I don't know.

I'd love to love Star Wars, but it's just not going to happen. Not while I'm laughing at dialogue that's supposed to be making my eyes damp or yawning at Yet Another Effect.

Episode Three

Saturday, 5 November 2005 16:51
apolla: (Phantom)

I've finally bothered to watch Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sniff, or whatever it's called.

Last fifteen minutes were pretty marvellous. Sadly, the two hours preceeding were filled with idiot dialogue, so much CGI that it was hard to focus and enough wooden acting to replant the Amazon rainforest.

I know that my hatred of George Lucas is well-known, so I won't bore you with that. I will tell you this: I would really love to love Star Wars. I think it's a great idea and although I disliked Episode II, I at least came away understanding a bit better about Vader in the OT. I just didn't realise that the petulant teenager thing would run over into the third installment too. I would love to love Star Wars, but it's not going to happen because these just aren't very good films. The original ones suffer only from the genuinely shite and primitive technology used (although that never really stood in Harryhausen's way...) but the recent lot are just... naff. It's like they creak under the weight of what they precede, and so perhaps that's why only the last fifteen minutes of III really stood out for me. I don't know.

I'd love to love Star Wars, but it's just not going to happen. Not while I'm laughing at dialogue that's supposed to be making my eyes damp or yawning at Yet Another Effect.

GRRRRRRRRRRR

Saturday, 15 October 2005 00:19
apolla: (Let It Be)

Daniel 'Face Like A Block Of Granite' Craig Is To Play 007

Suffice to say that I am extremely dis-chuffed about this turn of events. It's not like it's unexpected, but fucking hell, this is the bloke who played third fiddle to Angelina Jolie's padded bra in Tomb Raider 1! Mind you, this has got me so naffed off that I'd be prepared to renege on my previous Bond-stance for the bloke in the second Tomb Raider picture...

I don't dislike Daniel Craig. He's a half-decent actor (although the last time a decent actor [Timothy Dalton] played Bond, nobody liked it) and I've liked some of his other stuff. But this is not the stuff Bond Dreams are made of. I'm not saying Bond has to be Teen!Cosmo cover material. I wouldn't want that, but is that someone's idea of a great Bond?

And they're talking about cutting down on gadgets and getting 'darker' and getting more into the character.

Firstly, I'm no geek that hates to see their beloved franchise mucked about with. I thought Die Another Day relied too much on referencing past glories and not enough on coming up with new ones. I was dangerous close to getting bored at some points during, which was a shocker. Even Moonraker isn't boring, if only because it's a great way to come up with better ways to destroy your own soul.

But you know, what do they mean 'more character'? Bond is a simple creature at heart. He likes fast cars, faster women, drinking, gambling and the occasional spot of violence. That is why we like him. He occasionally makes reference to having possessed emotion at some point in the past, but it's rare, fleeting and all the better for it. He has a great sense of duty towards his country, which is nice, but we all know he does this job because nobody else would pay him to shag and shoot at the same time. At least, nobody else would pay as well. And we all know he'd never leave Moneypenny!

Seriously, every single time they've tried to 'improve' Bond, the producers have come unstuck. Aussie!Bond and BondInSpace are the best examples of this, I reckon. The true key to Bond is keeping him much the same as he's ever been, but devising new and interesting scenarios and situations to throw him into. Having to hunt down an old pal in Goldeneye? That was brilliant. Got to save the world dressed as a clown? Not so much. Have to save the world from a madman intent on blowing up the world's financial centres with the cunning use of fish? Let me finish writing it first and then we'll see.

Honestly, I hope that this rant gets proved wrong. I love Bond, James Bond and you all know that. I don't want to come away from the next one feeling disillusioned or disheartened or bored. We love James Bond for what he is, not what people say is trendy these days. We don't want him to twat about like Vin Diesel in xXx or *snore* Jason Bourne.

But Daniel Craig? Seriously? The only way I'm getting over this is by repeating the following to myself: At least it's not Clive Owen. At least it's not Clive Owen.

And one last thing: Have the producers forgotten the real rule of casting Bond? Always pick a Celt. The Greatest, Connery is a Scotsman. The Violent One, Dalton, is Welsh. The Recent Popular One, Brosnan, is an Irishman. SERIOUSLY, GUYS! You can't get an Englishman to do it! They're either too dull (CLIVE OWEN) or too conflicted and deep. Fuck that. Get the Irish in! Somebody page Colin Farrell and have him on standby! *dies laughing* Or get Gerard Butler in. He's Scottish, rugged-scruffy beautiful, sexy as whatever. So what if it wrecks any future career he might want (Bond does that to a bloke)? I'm talking about the FUTURE OF THE ENTIRE BOND FRANCHISE!

Daniel Craig? Was that REALLY the best they could do?

GRRRRRRRRRRR

Saturday, 15 October 2005 00:19
apolla: (Let It Be)

Daniel 'Face Like A Block Of Granite' Craig Is To Play 007

Suffice to say that I am extremely dis-chuffed about this turn of events. It's not like it's unexpected, but fucking hell, this is the bloke who played third fiddle to Angelina Jolie's padded bra in Tomb Raider 1! Mind you, this has got me so naffed off that I'd be prepared to renege on my previous Bond-stance for the bloke in the second Tomb Raider picture...

I don't dislike Daniel Craig. He's a half-decent actor (although the last time a decent actor [Timothy Dalton] played Bond, nobody liked it) and I've liked some of his other stuff. But this is not the stuff Bond Dreams are made of. I'm not saying Bond has to be Teen!Cosmo cover material. I wouldn't want that, but is that someone's idea of a great Bond?

And they're talking about cutting down on gadgets and getting 'darker' and getting more into the character.

Firstly, I'm no geek that hates to see their beloved franchise mucked about with. I thought Die Another Day relied too much on referencing past glories and not enough on coming up with new ones. I was dangerous close to getting bored at some points during, which was a shocker. Even Moonraker isn't boring, if only because it's a great way to come up with better ways to destroy your own soul.

But you know, what do they mean 'more character'? Bond is a simple creature at heart. He likes fast cars, faster women, drinking, gambling and the occasional spot of violence. That is why we like him. He occasionally makes reference to having possessed emotion at some point in the past, but it's rare, fleeting and all the better for it. He has a great sense of duty towards his country, which is nice, but we all know he does this job because nobody else would pay him to shag and shoot at the same time. At least, nobody else would pay as well. And we all know he'd never leave Moneypenny!

Seriously, every single time they've tried to 'improve' Bond, the producers have come unstuck. Aussie!Bond and BondInSpace are the best examples of this, I reckon. The true key to Bond is keeping him much the same as he's ever been, but devising new and interesting scenarios and situations to throw him into. Having to hunt down an old pal in Goldeneye? That was brilliant. Got to save the world dressed as a clown? Not so much. Have to save the world from a madman intent on blowing up the world's financial centres with the cunning use of fish? Let me finish writing it first and then we'll see.

Honestly, I hope that this rant gets proved wrong. I love Bond, James Bond and you all know that. I don't want to come away from the next one feeling disillusioned or disheartened or bored. We love James Bond for what he is, not what people say is trendy these days. We don't want him to twat about like Vin Diesel in xXx or *snore* Jason Bourne.

But Daniel Craig? Seriously? The only way I'm getting over this is by repeating the following to myself: At least it's not Clive Owen. At least it's not Clive Owen.

And one last thing: Have the producers forgotten the real rule of casting Bond? Always pick a Celt. The Greatest, Connery is a Scotsman. The Violent One, Dalton, is Welsh. The Recent Popular One, Brosnan, is an Irishman. SERIOUSLY, GUYS! You can't get an Englishman to do it! They're either too dull (CLIVE OWEN) or too conflicted and deep. Fuck that. Get the Irish in! Somebody page Colin Farrell and have him on standby! *dies laughing* Or get Gerard Butler in. He's Scottish, rugged-scruffy beautiful, sexy as whatever. So what if it wrecks any future career he might want (Bond does that to a bloke)? I'm talking about the FUTURE OF THE ENTIRE BOND FRANCHISE!

Daniel Craig? Was that REALLY the best they could do?

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